Ghana Visa Waiver Agreement

Diplomatic relations between Africa and the Caribbean are strengthening. Ghana plans to facilitate visa-free travel with nine countries such as Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and several Caribbean countries. A visa is also not required for holders of a dual national card issued by Ghana. A visa agreed in advance can be picked up on arrival. Referring to press reports that Malta has announced a visa waiver directive for Ghanaian passport holders, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Promotion wishes to clarify that on 17 October 2008 the Visa Waiver Programme was extended to seven new countries: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, the Republic of Korea and the Slovak Republic. DHS announced that nationals of these countries from November 17, 2008, they can travel visa-free for tourist and business trips of 90 days or less, provided they have a biometric passport and register online through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA). For more information, see the Visa Waiver Program. Under the Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015, persons who traveled to or stayed in Iran, Iraq, North Korea, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria or Yemen on or after March 1, 2011 (with limited exceptions for diplomatic or military travel in the service of a VWP country) OR, who are also Iranian nationals, Iraq, North Korea, Sudan and/or Syria are no longer allowed to travel with the VWP. For more details on the amendments to the Visa Waiver Program Act of 2015 and the Prevention of Terrorism Act of 2015, see http:cbp.gov/travel/international-visitors/visa-waiver-program.

As part of the Ghana 2019 Return Year, all visitors to Ghana will be able to obtain a visa upon arrival in December 2019 and January 2020. [19] Mr. Holness stated that the foreign ministers of both countries were tasked with negotiating and concluding the agreement. NOTE: Some travelers may not be allowed to enter the United States without a visa under the VWP. These include people who have been arrested, even if the arrest did not result in a criminal conviction, people with a criminal record (the Visa Act does not apply to the U.S. Visa Act), certain serious communicable diseases, those who have been denied entry to the United States, who have been deported from the United States, or who have previously been exceeded on the VWP. . . .